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Eupraxsophy

Secular humanist, freethinker, progressive, and bibliophile. I enjoy love, knowledge, and life itself.

How Americans Die

Bloomberg.com has posted a fascinating compilation of visual data that explores the changes in health, lifestyle, and mortality for Americans between 1970 and 2010. Aside from satiating my morbid curiosity, these data also make it possible to learn a lot about our society and how it’s changed based on how we die.

For example, most people are now dying from suicide, drug abuse, and natural causes…

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Earth Day: Celebrating Our Pale Blue Dot

In honor of Earth Day, here’s an excellent and timeless quote by the great Carl Sagan. It comes from a public lecture he was delivering at his own university of Cornell on October 13, 1994. During the speech he referenced the famous “Pale Blue Dot” photo of Earth taken by Voyager 1 in 1990 as it sailed away from Earth, more than 4 billion miles in the distance.

We succeeded in taking that picture…

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Spain: The Most LGBT-Friendly Country in the World

Spain: The Most LGBT-Friendly Country in the World

The results might be surprising, since — compared to the likes of the Netherlands or Scandinavia — Spain rarely comes to mind as being particularly pro-LGBT. But the conclusion comes from an extensive 40-country surveyconducted by the reputable Pew Research Group which asked respondents to discuss the morality of various issues, ranging from marital infidelity and divorce, to gambling, premarital…

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What Makes Countries Rich or Poor?

Jared Diamond, best known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Guns, Germs, and Steel, recently reviewed Why Nations Fail by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, a book I’m deeply interested in that explores the question in the title: why are some countries prosperous and developed, while others seem chronically poor and unstable?

As you’d imagine, the answer is complex and debatable, and Diamond…

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elisaintime:

thepegosaurus:

Sometimes I just feel inexplicably guilty for all the plants I’ve neglected to death. 

Yes!

This is too funny. 

(via finalxgod)

Amazing Scientific Achievements We’ll See Within A Decade

Amazing Scientific Achievements We’ll See Within A Decade

From StumbleUpon is an exciting collection of twenty-three incredible technological developments to look forward. While not all of these are guaranteed to be available or implemented by their probably date, they’re all a lot more likely to happen in our lifetimes then we previously thought. Plus, it never hurts to hope!

2012

Ultrabooks – The last two years have been all about the tablet. Laptops,…

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This is Ashol-Pan, a 13-year-old Kazakh eagle huntress living in the rugged Altai Mountains of…

Ashol Pan, 13-year-old Eagle Huntress , Mongolia Ashol Pan, 13-year-old Eagle Huntress , Mongolia II Ashol Pan, 13-year-old Eagle Huntress , Mongolia III Ashol Pan, 13-year-old Eagle Huntress , Mongolia IV Ashol Pan, 13-year-old Eagle Huntress , Mongolia V Ashol Pan, 13-year-old Eagle Huntress , Mongolia VI

This is Ashol-Pan, a 13-year-old Kazakh eagle huntress living in the rugged Altai Mountains of western Mongolia. The daughter of a famous hunter, she’s one of only 400 practicing eagle hunters, and the only known female to ever partake in the tradition in its 2,000-year history.

The Kazakhs of the Altai mountains are the only people that hunt with golden eagles, which are taken from nests…

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The World’s Billionaire Cities

Right off the heel of my last post about the world’s poorest denizens, comes sobering article from PolicyMic that highlights the stark reality of global wealth inequality. It identifies the world’s most popular cities for billionaires, based on a recent report from Forbes.

Moscow remains the billionaire capital of the world, with 84 of the world’s richest people, together worth a total of over…

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Portraits of People Living on a Dollar a Day

Portraits of People Living on a Dollar a Day

As a lifelong citizen in a well-off part of a wealthy country (the U.S.), I’m doubly insulated from the miserable circumstances that are the norm for most of my fellow humans. Around 17 percent of the world’s population — that’s one out of six people — live on a dollar or less a day, lacking any stable source of food, medical care, housing, and other basic needs.

Not only do more than a billion…

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Study Finds Government Influenced By Mostly Wealthy Interests

Think Progress reports on new research that won’t surprise anyone but helps confirm a troubling trend: the policies and actions of the U.S. government overwhelmingly align with the preferences of wealthy citizens and well-moneyed interest groups.

“That’s according to a forthcoming article in Perspectives on Politics by Martin Gilens of Princeton University and Benjamin I. Page of Northwestern…

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The Bootstraps Myth

From Melissa McEwan of the blog Shakesville:

The Myth of Bootstraps goes something like this: I never got any help from anyone. I achieved my American Dream all on my own, through hard work. I got an education, I saved my money, I worked hard, I took risks, and I never complained or blamed anyone else when I failed, and every time I fell, I picked myself up by my bootstraps and just worked even…

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Google Doodle Honors Pioneering Black Chemist Percy Julian

Google Doodle Honors Pioneering Black Chemist Percy Julian

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Eupraxsophy:

Remembering an unsung hero of science and medicine, who despite the challenges of racism and segregation, secured over 100 patents and 19 honorary doctorates for his groundbreaking work.

Originally posted on TIME:

Today’s Google Doodlehonors what would have been the 115th birthday of Percy Lavon Julian, a pioneering chemist who overcame the obstacles of segregation to ascend to…

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The Way We Treat Children

The Way We Treat Children

If my perceptions are correct, there seems to be a growing sentiment (perhaps typical of each older generation) that today’s youth are needlessly and excessively coddled and “wussified” (to use the kinder terminology). But the apparently prevailing notion that kids nowadays are excessively spoiled is actually dangerously overstated, according to a recent article in AlterNet by Paul L. Thomas, a…

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Gratitude Is the New Willpower

Gratitude Is the New Willpower

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Harvard Business Review:

A fascinating study that shows another benefit to being grateful for one’s good fortune: restraint and willpower.

Originally posted on HBR Blog Network - Harvard Business Review:

Patience is a virtue, especially when it comes to building capital. But as with most virtues, it’s not always easy to muster, since it usually requires resisting temptations for gratification on…

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The James Bond of Philanthropy

The James Bond of Philanthropy

In my view, with great wealth comes great responsibility. It gives you the capacity to do tremendous good or harm in the world, far more than the overwhelming majority of fellow humans. A little-known Irish-American businessman named Chuck Feeney exemplifies the incredible moral potential that the world’s richest can exercise if they so choose. Forbes did a piece on this amazing philanthropist in…

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